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Family receives $19.2 million verdict for child’s birth injuries

According to aboutlawsuits.com, a medical malpractice lawyer recently helped a family receive a $19.2 million verdict in a medical malpractice lawsuit involving their infant daughter. Fifteen days after the couple’s three-month premature daughter was born, the infant was given an improper dosage of nutrients. The child now suffers from cerebral palsy and blindness.

As a result of the events that transpired, the child’s parents brought a medical malpractice lawsuit against the medical center’s operator. Their complaint alleged that the infant was given a nutrients’ dosage that was 100 times more potent than the doctor’s prescription. Consequently, the 15-day old infant went into cardiac arrest and suffered complications. The center’s operator has maintained that the child’s current medical problems are a result of her premature birth. The operator has, however, admitted that it made a serious error during her treatment.

Birth injuries are a specific category of medical malpractice lawsuits that arise from a medical practitioner’s intentional or negligent actions either before, during, or following a child’s birth. The medical practitioner, who was responsible for the injuries, may be required to pay compensatory damages to the victim. These damages are an attempt to place the victim in a position as though the malpractice never occurred.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, cerebral palsy refers to disorders that affect an individual’s ability to maintain muscle control as a result of brain damage. The CDC further states that a recent study projected 1 in 303 children suffer from cerebral palsy. Cerebral palsy may be the result of genetic conditions, a shortage of blood supply to the brain before birth, infection, brain bleeding, a lack of oxygen, jaundice, and brain injury.

Our Chicago injury attorneys have successfully handled many birth injuries. For instance, the firm won a $4.5 million settlement for a child that has cerebral palsy from brain damage that occurred as a result of the family practice physician’s negligence.