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Stem Cell Bank Launches New Trials Which Could be Used to Treat Birth Injuries

Earlier this week the San Bruno Patch reported on stem cell research developments which one day may prove critical for those working on ways to help those who have suffered from a range of issues, including birth injuries. The story shares the work of a local company that is partnering with a range of research institutions as it looks into ways that stem cells taken from the umbilical cords of mothers can be used in research down the road. More specifically, the focus of this project is developing ways to treat conditions which affect children. Along with many other observers, our Illinois birth injury attorneys believe strongly that stem cell developments may one day prove incredibly fruitful for the millions of families with loved ones who face challenges due to injuries that they develop at birth or during pregnancy.

The company’s “Cord Based Registry” is working with the research institutions as part of the Federal Drug Administration’s stem cell trial program. The goal of the program is to figure out ways that the child’s own stem cells can be used to treat conditions that the child may face down the road. These injuries could include developmental problems seen immediately or shortly after the child’s birth-like cerebral palsy-or other problems which develop later, like traumatic brain injuries or hearing loss.

The research effort is actually being split into at least three separate trials. The trials are run by a different research institutions. The company involved has been working in these medical research areas for years and has been storing umbilical cord stem cells. Summarizing the project, the vice president of scientific and medical affairs at the company explained that they are “partnering with a series of specialists who want to research the use of a child’s own newborn blood stem cells on a variety of disease states.” The company was interested in the project because it represents a way to advance regenerative therapies in a promising way.

One of the trials involves a partnership with the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. They will tackle issues related to traumatic brain injury and hearing loss. The study, with the cooperation of the Children’s Memorial Hermann Hospital, will follow ten different children who have hearing loss obtained after their birth and ten children who suffered a traumatic brain injury within a year and a half of their birth.

The third project, spearheaded by Georgia Health Sciences University will examine whether the use of one’s own stem cells can improve the quality of life for those with cerebral palsy. Our Illinois cerebral palsy attorneys know that many local families have children with the condition and are holding out hope that one day this line of research may be used to provide a full or partial cure for their loved ones. Like the other two studies, the CP effort will follow a group of children (40 in total) as they are given stem cell treatments. They will be measured on a range of different criteria to see if any effects are seen.

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